Trying the Multi-Project Route


After finding myself stalled out on the socks I am working on, and needing a project I could work on kind of without thinking much at a party I went to this last weekend, I started my net commission – a pair of fingerless mitts for a friend.

I haven’t gotten much knitting done this week, though. I’ve had writing and editing deadlines up to my ears.  This is not because I have had too much work; it’s more because I seem to have acquired a summer cold that is kicking my butt.

I hope to get back to my regular schedule soon.

Knitting Apathy


I’m struggling to get a pair of socks knit that should have taken me two weeks, tops.  Instead, it’s been a month or so, and I have to get them finished, because I have other commissions in the pipeline.

Not sure what the problem is; it doesn’t feel like summer knitting apathy — you know — when it’s just too damned hot to knit.  Oh well, will slog through, one stitch at a time, if necessary.

Why I Love Independent Dyers


As many of you know I do get a good portion of the yarn I buy from independent dyers. This is not to say I don’t buy yarn from major companies any more; it is to say that when I have the choice and the money, the independent dyer often wins out.

I feel this way for a number of reasons:

1.  I can build a real relationship with an independent dyer.  Some of the dyers I use (I’m looking at you, Kellee and Melissa) have become real friends over the years, whether I’ve ever met them in person or not.

2.  Independent dyers are primarily doing this because they love to create gorgeous yarns. Yes, when they earn money from it, it’s wonderful, but these are fellow creatives, and I will always support a creative over a corporation, given the choice.

3.  The service.  Maybe I’m just lucky, but I have never had bad service from an independent dyer. What I have had is friendly and excellent service, often accompanied by little surprises (of the pleasant sort) in my orders. I’ve gotten stickers, pencils, stitch markers, and once, I even was gifted with a travel kit of body essentials.  Beats the heck out of a snarling clerk in a discount yarn store any day, let me tell you.

4. The yarn itself. I can order exactly what I want, in the yarn I want.  And I have never had a dyer charge me more for a custom hank than they did for a hank they just came up with.  I get the choice of yarn, too. That skein of Panda she did in DK – can I get it in sock or laceweight? Yep. And if she (or he, but most of the dyers I deal with are women) doesn’t have the particular weight I want, they will let me know when they are expecting their next shipment of it, as well as letting me know what they do have on hand in the weight I want.

5. Negotiating power. I am on a limited budget, and I have had independent dyers hold a color I fell in love with until my pension check comes in and clears. And if that is not possible, or if someone else has shown interest in the same skein(s), I have been able to work out deals where they would dye some up for me when I had the cash to spend on it.  I have also been given wonderful discounts for being a loyal customer (and that also goes for independent pattern designers).

6. Finally, these are people who understand. They love fiber as much as i do; in all its colors, textures, and glory.  They get it.  There is an understanding between us, even when I am negotiating my first or second order, that their fiber is going to a good home, and that I will turn that fiber into something that I or someone else will love and cherish.

And I think that understanding is — quite possibly — the best part of dealing with an independent dyer.  It’s what makes us sisters (and brothers) under the skin.  We each understand and respect the effort the other one will put into creating our end result.  And it’s a very seductive feeling.  And it’s why I keep returning to independent dyers, spinners, and other creatives when I want really good yarn for something.

I Have Had no Time for Knitting Today.


Between deadlines, client meetings, an online class, and a futon frame that should have taken an hour and a half to put together, but is now jury-rigged because the screws don’t fit the holes, which are not properly aligned, I have had no time to breathe, let alone knit.

Besides, I’ve been sufficiently upset today that it probably would hve played hell with my gauge.

Hopefully, life will get back on something vaguely resembling an even keel tomorrow.

Still Here, Still Working, Progress of Sorts Being Made.


I’m almost caught up on the socks I am making, and I have a line on the yarn for a scarf for a client, although she now wants to postpone the commission for a bit. I sent her an email back as to whether I should hold the yarn for her, or can I use it for other stuff, and order new yarn when she’s ready (I will be getting it through an indie dyer I often use).

I also got my domain names back from the person who had theoretically been administering them for me, so at some point soon I will start building a website to host this blog and other knitting related things.

Anyway, I just spent two hours working on the socks, so I must get back to writing now — I have some articles due before I go to bed.

Taking a Day Off


I apologize for not posting this yesterday, but I was writing all day (paying jobs), and by the time I got home from the second Seder, it was so late that I pretty much just fell over.

So please excuse me for being all too human and taking a day off.  I promise to not do this very often, as I know I only update this blog on a weekly basis.

I am still plugging away at a pair of socks for a client, and should have them done in the next week sometime, and I have a couple of projects down the road — one of which combines two of my favorite things, writing and knitting!  Details on that as they emerge.

For those who celebrate Passover, I wish you a good, safe, healthy, happy week, and for those who celebrate Easter, I wish you also a good, safe, healthy happy day. For those who celebrate something else, or just the coming of Spring, I wish you the best of the season!

I Found the Perfect Pattern for a Gift for My Sister…


…who, of course, has chosen to no longer speak to me (at least for the moment).

It’s the Morehouse Farms’ Dachshund Scarf. I’ve long been a fan of Morehouse Farms yarns — I first ran across them at the Farmers’ Market in Union Square, a couple of decades ago.  Their patterns are usually easy to read, and follow, and the results are exactly what you expect them to be.

It’s a pity my sister has closed herself off from me, but I’m sure that there will be someone else who will want to make or give this scarf, so I put the link above.  The thing is, my sister loves dachshunds and has raised a number of mini dachshunds so this would have been perfect for her.

Heck, I might eventually make it for myself — on of my favorite books as a kid was Pretzel, about a dachshund. Pretzel was written by Margaret Rey, and illustrated by H.A. Rey, the same folks who brought us Curious George (another kidhood favorite).

Anyway, I am still plugging along on Josie’s socks, and in deadline hell, so this is going to be a short entry.  I want to pick brains about another project I have in the pipeline, but that will just have to wait until I can organize my thoughts about it.

Previous Older Entries

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,300 other followers

%d bloggers like this: